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Reviews

Brandon Grace (Charley Hexam), Ellie-May Sheridan (Jenny Wren) and Scott Karim (Bradley Headstone) in London Tide at the National Theatre. © Marc Brenner
18 Apr
Reviews
Stuart King

Review: LONDON TIDE at National Lyttelton

On a stage which is pre-set to look like the backstage of any modern theatre, complete with lowered lighting-rig and blacked-out floors, the current production playing at the Lyttelton space, begins very much as it ends. During the intervening hours however, and despite the minimal set, the stage is a very busy place indeed, reflective of the Dickensian period’s hustle and bustle and especially the districts and people who live closest to the river.

Brandon Grace (Charley Hexam), Ellie-May Sheridan (Jenny Wren) and Scott Karim (Bradley Headstone) in London Tide at the National Theatre. © Marc BrennerBrandon Grace (Charley Hexam), Ellie-May Sheridan (Jenny Wren) and Scott Karim (Bradley Headstone) in London Tide at the National Theatre. © Marc Brenner.

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Almeida Theatre - The Comeuppance. Yolanda Kettle, Ferdinand Kingsley, Katie Leung, Tamara Lawrance and Anthony Welsh. Credit Marc Brenner
15 Apr
Reviews
Stuart King

Review: THE COMEUPPANCE at Almeida

A small group of high school friends attend an informal pre-party to their main 20th anniversary school reunion. Some have stayed local to the now Trumpian American backwater, whilst others moved away or were irreparably changed by their time spent serving overseas. As we learn how each has been variously touched by the passing of time, they bemoan elements of their lives and some cannot resist the urge to pick at old wounds.

Almeida Theatre - The Comeuppance. Yolanda Kettle, Ferdinand Kingsley, Katie Leung, Tamara Lawrance and Anthony Welsh. Credit Marc BrennerYolanda Kettle, Ferdinand Kingsley, Katie Leung, Tamara Lawrance and Anthony Welsh in The Comeuppance at the Almeida Theatre. Credit Marc Brenner

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Aaron Thakar (Ash) and Destiny Mayers (Lilah) in Artificially Yours at Riverside Studios. Photo by Andrew Fosker
12 Apr
Reviews
Stuart King

Review: ARTIFICIALLY YOURS at Riverside Studios

Pitching itself as a very modern dark comedy, ARTIFICIALLY YOURS explores the impact of AI technology on three couples who each have always listening therapy devices in their homes to help solve basic (and often petty) disputes. But can such a device really work? More importantly, is it doomed to failure when confronted with the deeper complexities around human interaction and disconnection?

Aaron Thakar (Ash) and Destiny Mayers (Lilah) in Artificially Yours at Riverside Studios. Photo by Andrew FoskerAaron Thakar (Ash) and Destiny Mayers (Lilah) in Artificially Yours at Riverside Studios. Photo by Andrew Fosker

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Kwaku Mills (Ensemble), Rhiannon Clements (Anne Brontë), Gemma Whelan (Charlotte Brontë) and Nick Blakeley (Ensemble) in Underdog: The Other Other Brontë at the National Theatre (c) Isha Shah
08 Apr
Reviews
Stuart King

Review: UNDERDOG: THE OTHER OTHER BRONTË at the National Theatre Dorfman

The brutality and imbalance of life lived as a woman in 1840s Britain is writ large, as three soon-to-be-renowned sisters, make a pact to write their novels as one mask under the brotherly pseudonyms Currer, Ellis and Acton Bell. No-one, not even the Brontës themselves could have predicted the success of their bid to hoodwink publishers and finally (albeit by deception) become representative female ‘voices in the room’ of Victorian society.

Kwaku Mills (Ensemble), Rhiannon Clements (Anne Brontë), Gemma Whelan (Charlotte Brontë) and Nick Blakeley (Ensemble) in Underdog: The Other Other Brontë at the National Theatre (c) Isha Shah Kwaku Mills (Ensemble), Rhiannon Clements (Anne Brontë), Gemma Whelan (Charlotte Brontë) and Nick Blakeley (Ensemble) in Underdog: The Other Other Brontë at the National Theatre (c) Isha Shah

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Life With Oscar - Arcola Theatre
03 Apr
Reviews
Stuart King

Review: LIFE WITH OSCAR at Arcola Theatre

The promotional material for this rambling monologue is a picture of a guy in his ‘silver fox’ years, clutching an Oscar. However, beyond the cleverness of that enticing device and the promise manifest in the title, very little of genuine creativity, wit, or interest is revealed in Nick Cohen’s effort.

Life With Oscar - Arcola TheatreNick Cohen in Life with Oscar at Arcola Theatre. Photo G Taylor

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